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Actiniccheilitis and risk of squamous cell carcinoma: a short review of etiology and treatment

corresponding
SOFIA RAFAELA MAITO VELASCO, ADELSON FRANCISCO MAIA-JÚNIOR, JOSÉ ROBERTO DE MAGALHÃES BASTOS, ARIÁDNES NÓBREGA OLIVEIRA, MAGALI DE LOURDES CALDANA, ROOSEVELT SILVA BASTOS*
*Corresponding Author 
Disciplina de Saúde Coletiva – Depto Odontopediatria, Ortodontia e Saúde Coletiva – Faculdade de Odontologia de Bauru – Universidade de São Paulo, Al. Dr. Octávio Pinheiro Brisolla 9-75, CEP 17012-901 – Bauru-SP, Brazil

Abstract

Actinic cheilitis is considered a carcinogenic injury. It is characterized by lesions on the red edge of the lower lip as a white board and has a higher risk of incidence in Caucasian workers who are exposed to the sun often. The objective of this paper is to present a review of the risks involved in the etiology and progression of actinic cheilitis for squamous cell carcinoma. Once diagnosed, several treatments may be performed to contain its evolution, however, the emphasis on the need to alert people to the means of preventing the etiologic risk factors: self-examination of the lips and periodic consultations with a dentist and/or doctor.


INTRODUCTION




Premalignant lesion is a disease syndrome that may lead to cancer. The term was proposed in 1875 by Romanian physician Victor Babes. Oral premalignant lesions are relatively common, occurring in about 2.5% of the population (1). Actinic cheilitis is considered a premalignant lesion, better known as carcinogenic injury. It is a term used to describe degeneration and pre-malignant changes that occur in the mouth. Actinic refers to the chemically active electromagnetic spectrum and cheilitis refers to inflammation of the lips (2).

ACTINIC CHEILITIS



Actinic cheilitis is caused by solar radiation, occurring most commonly in Caucasians who work in open spaces (3), i.e.