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Designing foods and beverages 
for approved nutrition and health claims

corresponding

SARAH KUCZORA
Campden BRI, Station Road, Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire, GL55 6LD, United Kingdom

Abstract

When designing products with nutrition or health claims in mind, or thinking about retrospectively adding a claim to an existing product, it is important that you fully understand the legislation involved, and the effects this could have on how you formulate your product or how you phrase the claims that you are making about it. Legislation could persuade you that a small change is required to your ingredients, but this small change may in fact lead to the product becoming less stable or less appealing to the consumer. It may result in a complete reformulation being required to achieve the desired end-point.
Although not discussed in this paper, it is important to note that, as with other aspects of global trading, the Regulation of health and nutrition claims will differ outside Europe. For example, in the United States claims are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration.


INTRODUCTION

Product development requires a holistic approach, incorporating consumer acceptability, commercial viability, technical feasibility and legal compliance. This article highlights key aspects to consider when designing products for nutrition and health claims in Europe, which could save time and investment further along the development process.
The use of nutrition and health claims on food and drink packaging, or in any advertising of food and drink products, has received a great deal of attention in recent years. This practice was subject only to general rules preventing false or misleading labelling information in Europe until 2007, after which Regulation (EC) No. 1924/2006 on nutrition and health claims (1) was adopted. This Regulation sta