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Has the race for the White House become a health issue?

corresponding

Paola Arosio 
Freelance journalist

Abstract

The candidate who will be elected the next US President on November 8 will have to deal with America’s healthcare issues, from Obamacare to the ever-increasing cost of drugs, issues that involve the government, the citizens and pharma companies. Though it looks like a complex challenge, improving the American healthcare system is something both candidates have declared to be willing to do.


As election year 2016 rolls along in the United States, the race for the White House seems to be getting tougher all the time. Hillary Clinton, the Democrats’ nominee, faces Republican candidate Donald Trump. After winning the Super Tuesday primaries in March in 12 States, they were both officially nominated presidential candidates during their respective party convention in July. Amongst the many topics debated in the election campaign, the hottest have been immigration, access to weapons, taxes, employment and climate, while healthcare has been left aside a little – for reasons that are actually quite obvious. For instance, back in 1992, Bill Clinton had made healthcare reform a centerpeice of his campaign platform and, soon after being elected, he had appointed his wife Hillary