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Clean label

corresponding

ANTON J. ALLDRICK
Campden BRI, Chipping Campden, United Kingdom

Regulatory developments in food labelling such as the, ‘Food Information to Consumers Regulation’ (Regulation (EU) No 1169/2011) in the European Union reflect, in part an increasing desire amongst citizens to know what ingredients are used in their foods and require food manufacturers to declare food ingredients unambiguously. These have been accompanied by changes in consumer preference, with a group of consumers discriminating in favour of foods containing ingredients which they recognise and trust. This preference is, in part, reflected by the ‘Clean Label’ movement which represents a desire by a significant market segment for food products containing naturally occurring, familiar, and/or simple ingredients which are easy to recognise, understand, and pronounce. In terms of marketing, adoption of a clean-label approach assists in positioning a product as ‘natural’, ‘organic’ and/or ‘free from additives/preservatives’. 

From a product (re)development point of view, the desired ‘Clean Label’ end-point is often seen as involving the use of ingredients which are generally accepted by consumers (often desc ...



 

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