Print this article
P. 12-15 /

Coeliac disease: an overview

CHRISTINA R SADLER*, STEFAN STORCKSDIECK GENANNT BONSMANN, MARY FRIEL
*Corresponding author
European Food Information Council (EUFIC), Tassel House, rue Paul-Emile Janson 6, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium

Abstract

Coeliac disease is an autoimmune disorder which can develop at any time throughout life. In susceptible individuals, eating gluten, a protein in wheat and related grains, causes damage to the small intestine. Currently, testing for coeliac disease is recommended for individuals at high-risk or presenting symptoms; however it is underdiagnosed due to the diverse clinical presentation. Following a gluten-free diet is currently the only effective treatment. The prescribed gluten-free diet should be monitored, with dietary assessment and support from a trained dietitian. Food labelling helps people with coeliac disease identify ‘gluten free’ or ‘very low gluten’ foods. Research is exploring alternative treatments, and whether the timing and amount of gluten consumed during infancy can be altered for the prevention of coeliac disease.


COELIAC DISEASE AND OTHER ADVERSE REACTIONS TO FOOD

For a small percentage of people, specific foods or components of food may cause non-toxic adverse reactions, typically classified as food allergy (immune-mediated) or food intolerance (non immune-mediated) (1).
A food allergy occurs when an allergen (usually a protein in the offending food, which in the majority of people will not produce an adverse reaction) sets off a chain of reproducible reactions involving the immune system. Allergic reactions can be classified based on the mechanisms involved, i.e. they can be either IgE (immunoglobulin E antibodies) or non-IgE mediated reactions. The former are usually immediate; whereas, the latter are usually more delayed (1).
Food intolerances do no