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Public Health Genomics:
translating nutrigenomics research into population health benefits

JOHN A. MILNER*, ELAINE B. TRUJILLO
*Corresponding author
National Institutes of Health, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute
6130 Executive Blvd., Suite 3164, Rockville, MD 20892, USA

Abstract

The “omics of nutrition”, which includes nutrigenetics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics are fundamental to the understanding of genetic-diet interactions that influence key cellular processes andultimately affect phenotype. A multitude of food components have been reported to alter the expression of a gene or itsproducts. However, the response is highly dependent on the quantity and duration of exposures and variation in the targetbeing influenced by the food component(s). Personalized nutrition, which builds on knowledge of the “omics”, will assist inidentifying those who benefit most, or put themselves at risk, as a result of dietary intervention strategies.