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“On demand” deodorant: mechanism of action and efficacy

corresponding

Franco Gasparri
Department of Pharmacy (DIFARMA),
University of Salerno, Italy

Abstract

Perspiration is the result of eccrine and apocrine gland activity. At the time it is secreted, perspiration is an odourless liquid. Perspiration odour forms when it comes into contact with microbes and bacteria that are always present on the skin and in particular in the pilosebaceous canal.
The enzymes produced by the bacterial metabolism permit the components of perspiration to transform into sub-products with a lower molecular weight, therefore becoming more volatile and characterised by an unpleasant odour. The interesting result therefore is an “enzymatic path” for controlling body odours without using antimicrobial active substances. The purpose of the study is to evaluate a deodorant formula based on a “deo on demand” system with enzymatic cleavage action as anti enzyme activity in vitro and deodorant activity in vivo. The results obtained show how the deodorant system studied demonstrates, in vitro, significant anti-proteasic and anti-lipasic activity and in vivo, creates a significant reduction in axillary odour.


INTRODUCTION

Perspiration is the result of eccrine and apocrine gland activity, very high numbers of which are on the surface of our skin. Their continuous activity regulates nervous, hormonal and environmental stimuli. At the time it is secreted, perspiration is an odourless liquid.
Perspiration odour forms when it comes into contact with microbes and bacteria that are always present on the skin and in particular in the pilosebaceous canal. For this reason, the perspiration produced by axillary apocrine glands that use the pilosebaceous canal as an extrusion duct is particularly important in the formation of body odours. Apocrine perspiration is primarily made up of lipids, proteins, nitrogen derivatives and carbohydrates, and is therefore an excellent terrain for bacterial metabolism. The enzymes produced by the bacterial metabolism(1) permit the components of perspiration to transform into sub-products with a lower molecular weight, therefore becoming more volatile and featuring an unpleasant odour. In particular, bacterial proteases trigger the transformation into ammonia, amines and sulphur derivatives (hydrogen sulphide and mercaptan) while ...



 

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