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Marie Curie: A science heroine in war and peace

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MARCO MILANO
Graduated in Materials Science and specialized in diagnostic techniques and materials for renewable energy sources and science communication.

Abstract

The 150th anniversary of Marie Curie’s birth has been celebrated all around the world since November 2017. 2018 is the also the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. This is an unmissable opportunity to remember and better understand Madame Curie, focusing on her experiences on the battlefront and her exceptional contribution to the progress of modern society, as a scientist and also as a woman.


On November 7, 1867, Marie Skłodowska Curie was born in Warsaw. She has always been recognised as a brilliant mind who made a major contribution to the development of science. The 150th anniversary of her birth has been celebrated across the world by the scientific community and others in recent months. This is a vital opportunity to remember and better understand Marie Curie and her exceptional contribution to the progress of modern society, as a scientist and also as a woman.

Looking back at Marie Curie’s life, one quickly becomes aware of the specific events that marked her life, those of her contemporaries and which, in some ways, continue to influence our own lives today.

The end of World War I - which sees its own 100th anniversary this year - represented an important watershed for both chemistry and medicine. A few crucial innovations that were brought to the battlefront – and which, in some cases, were specifically designed for it - both to fight and to treat soldiers in the trenches, made their appearance exactly 100 years ago, and they changed society permanently.

For the first time, chemical products that had made huge progress in industry ...